FFOZ TV Review: Treasure in Heaven

FFOZ TV episode 24Episode 24: What did Jesus mean when he told his disciples to store up treasures in Heaven? Episode twenty-four will take a look at the phrase “treasures in Heaven” through a Jewish lens. “In Heaven” in this phrase does not mean “in the sky” but rather “with God.” Jesus tells us that God rewards his children openly for what they do in secret. Viewers will learn that being disciples of Jesus means being a generous person, giving to the needy, doing the work of the kingdom, and not focusing on earthly gain.

-from the Introduction to FFOZ TV: The Promise of What is to Come
Episode 24: Treasure in Heaven (click this link to watch video, not the image above)

The Lesson: The Mystery of Treasure in Heaven

This episode went pretty much the way I expected with just a few small question marks. First Fruits of Zion (FFOZ) educators and authors Toby Janicki and Aaron Eby based today’s teaching on the following verses:

Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and rottenness consume them, and thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and rottenness do not consume them, and thieves do not break in and steal. For in the place where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.

Matthew 6:19-21 (DHE Gospels)

Toby asked about how one can actually store a treasure in Heaven? Is there some sort of cosmic retirement plan in the Afterlife? Is it possible to do something to store treasure in Heaven now so we’ll have it to spend after we die?

These seem like silly questions but throughout much of the episode, Toby kept returning to these points. I started to wonder what the traditional Christian teaching must be about this passage? Does the Church or some part of it believe that there is a literal treasure in Heaven that we get when we die?

For viewers who have been regularly watching this show, it should be apparent that the reference to “Heaven” doesn’t have to literally be the place where God lives. The Hebrew word for “Heaven” can also mean “sky”. However, given the general theme of this first season of the FFOZ TV show, “Heaven” is more likely being used as a circumlocution to avoid saying the most personal Name of God. For instance, the phrase “Kingdom of Heaven” actually means “Kingdom of God” as in the coming Messianic Era.

That would mean storing up “treasure in heaven” means something like storing up “treasure in the Messianic Kingdom.” But that’s still mysterious if you don’t understand certain Rabbinic concepts and idioms.

“So when you give to the poor, do not sound a trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, so that they may be honored by men. Truly I say to you, they have their reward in full. But when you give to the poor, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, so that your giving will be in secret; and your Father who sees what is done in secret will reward you.”

Matthew 6:2-4 (NASB)

Toby JanickiThis should help provide clarity. Toby links “storing up treasure in heaven” to these earlier verses in the chapter. Jesus teaches a direct link between giving to charity in secret and being openly rewarded by God. This is also a Rabbinic concept, but one where Christianity treads lightly, since we are taught that salvation is a free gift and not tied to anything we can do, such as give to charity. Also, Isaiah 64:6 defines “righteous acts” as “filthy rags” so it would seem as if this interpretation of Jesus’ teaching contradicts not only older scripture but Christian doctrine as well.

We aren’t talking about “buying our way into Heaven” with our “filthy” righteous deeds, though. We are however, talking about a relationship between our giving to charity and some sort of reward from God. More specifically, we are talking about giving in secret, without using our “generosity” to draw attention to ourselves, and that is what God rewards openly.

As a side note, this makes me wonder why some churches today have listings on their walls or in some public document of the names of their larger contributors if Jesus taught to give in secret?

If you say, “See, we did not know this,”
Does He not consider it who weighs the hearts?
And does He not know it who keeps your soul?
And will He not render to man according to his work?

Proverbs 24:12 (NASB)

It looks like Jesus isn’t contradicting this older portion of scripture and in fact, he seems to be teaching the same lesson. “And will He not render to man according to his work?” So what we do here in this life does seem to matter to God and God responds to our actions by giving back to us in the manner we’ve given (or not given) to others.

This brings us to the first clue for this episode:

Clue 1: When Jesus tells us to “store up treasures in heaven,” he is not telling us to store up treasures in the Afterlife, but to store up credit with God.

Storing up “credit with God” still makes it sound like we’re opening up a credit line at the Bank of Heaven and then drawing against it, but that makes no sense at all. There’s got to be more to this lesson.

As it turns out, there is:

The lamp of the body is the eye, and if your eye is whole, your entire body will be illuminated. But if your eye is evil, your entire body will be darkened — and if the light within you is darkened, how great is the darkness.

A man is not able to serve two masters. For he will hate the one and love the other, or he will cling to one and despise the other. You are not able to serve both God and mamon.

Matthew 6:22-24 (DHE Gospels)

OK, maybe that didn’t clear everything up. To get a better handle on what Jesus is saying, the scene shifts to Aaron Eby in Israel for a Hebrew lesson on the term “the evil eye.”

So what is the “evil eye” and the “whole” or “good eye”? Aaron tells his audience that one interpretation of an “evil eye” is a description of what happens to a believer who looks at forbidden things. Another tells of a believer who is not spiritually perceptive. But in the overall context of these verses, which seem to be addressing money, that doesn’t make sense.

Aaron EbyAs it turns out, having an “evil eye” in Jewish idiom means being stingy. Also, the words translated as “whole eye” or “good eye,” given the idiomatic meaning being referenced, are better translated as “beautiful eye,” meaning generous. But how does it make sense that your “eye” can indicate stinginess or generosity? According to Aaron, it has to do with how you look at or perceive others. If you look at someone with good intent or in order to see the good in them, you are looking at them with a “beautiful” eye and are inclined to be generous toward them. However, if you look at people with poor intent or in a negative manner, you are inclined to be withholding from the needy and thus have an “evil” eye.

Returning to Toby in the studio, we come to the next clue:

Clue 2: Jesus’ words about storing up treasures with God are directly linked to “beautiful eye” and “evil eye.”

Now we seem to be zeroing in on the solution to today’s mystery. But if God rewards believers for giving generously and in secret to charity, what sort of reward is provided? Toby said that it is not along the lines of prosperity theology. It’s not a matter of giving large amounts of money to certain charities or churches in order to get back a boatload of cash in this world.

So what is the answer?

“For this reason I say to you, do not be worried about your life, as to what you will eat or what you will drink; nor for your body, as to what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air, that they do not sow, nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not worth much more than they?

Do not worry then, saying, ‘What will we eat?’ or ‘What will we drink?’ or ‘What will we wear for clothing?’ For the Gentiles eagerly seek all these things; for your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. But seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.

“So do not worry about tomorrow; for tomorrow will care for itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.”

Matthew 6:25-26, 31-34 (NASB)

In a nutshell, this means that we shouldn’t worry about the basic necessities of life such as food, clothing, and shelter, because God knows we need these things and will provide. Instead of devoting our resources to accumulating material possessions, we should seek first the Messianic Kingdom, and “the basics” will take care of themselves.

By being generous, we come closer to entering the Kingdom of Heaven. Conversely, a stingy person is removed or retreating from entering the Messianic Kingdom.

This sort of reminds me of what I wrote about the FFOZ TV episode on The Golden Rule. How we treat others brings us closer or places us further away from entering the Messianic Kingdom. But as I said before, although we’re not talking about buying our way into Heaven, how can being generous or stingy admit or inhibit living in the Era of the Messiah?

Unless it’s somehow related to the lesson of the “sheep and goats” we find in Matthew 25:31-46, which is also talking about generosity and stinginess. Even a believer who is stingy or has exhibited the “evil eye” may be rejected by the King upon his return. What we do does matter. This reading of the Bible makes that inescapable, although it’s not always easy to understand.

The final clue is:

Clue 3: Storing treasure in heaven is the same as seeking the Kingdom of God.

It doesn’t mean that God will provide a one-to-one system of giving vs reward whereby if you give a certain amount to your church or to charity, that you’ll automatically get back the same or more than you “invested.” In fact, that sort of theology goes against what Jesus taught, since he commanded giving in secret, which at least implies the idea of giving generously with no thought of reward.

What Did I Learn?

I actually knew the vast majority of what was taught today, but some of what was said got me to thinking. As I see it (and this is just my opinion), by being generous in the here and now, we are somewhat foreshadowing the coming Messianic Kingdom, which will be characterized by kindness, generosity to all, and peace. Just as each weekly Shabbat is a foreshadow and a preview of the lasting Shabbat of Messiah, so too every mitzvah of giving we commit, each act of tzedakah, is a momentary snapshot of how all humanity will behave toward each other one day.

tzedakah-to-lifeI have a better “feeling” about this being part of the “reward” rather than necessarily admittance into or rejection from the Messianic Era, but as the passage from Matthew 25 indicates, there will be those believers who get in and those who are given the boot.

Also, as I said above, I don’t see any sort of formula being developed out of these scriptures and this lesson whereby the more you give, the more you get in cash or material goods. There have been far too many saints or tzaddikim who have lived and died in poverty, even though they were abundantly generous with whatever they had, to make me believe that giving to charity is some sort of insurance against poverty or some other bad things happening to me. “The Lord gives and the Lord takes. Blessed be the Name of the Lord” (Job 1:21). God does as He wills. Sometimes, even the most devout servants of God don’t have access to even the basics of food, water, clothing, or shelter, even though this seems to contradict the words of the Master.

But we don’t see this so much in the West because most of us can at least make ends meet if not live rather well, especially when compared to the kind of abject poverty we see in what we call “third-world countries.”

And He looked up and saw the rich putting their gifts into the treasury. And He saw a poor widow putting in two small copper coins. And He said, “Truly I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all of them; for they all out of their surplus put into the offering; but she out of her poverty put in all that she had to live on.”

Luke 21:1-4 (NASB)

I thought this deserved an honorable mention, since we are talking about giving generously. OK, so it’s not giving in secret if Jesus and his disciples can see how much everyone is giving, but we do see a woman living in great poverty, probably a state of lacking most of us have never experienced, giving all she had to live on for the sake of God and the Temple. I don’t think I could advise a person to do that, holding nothing back for themselves, but then again, maybe she was not worrying about her next meal, what clothes she was going to wear, or the place she was going to rest her head, just as Messiah taught.

It’s a hard lesson in this world of 401Ks, Medical Savings Accounts, and saving up to send the kids to college.

I seem to remember, probably from something Dave Ramsey said, that families should include charitable giving in their budgets in the same way as we budget for car repairs, groceries, clothing, and so on. This isn’t giving all we’ve got, but it is giving what we can if we are so inclined.

Only two more episodes in season one left to review.

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7 thoughts on “FFOZ TV Review: Treasure in Heaven”

  1. This is fertile ground in a time when so many “wolves” offer God’s “favor” if you only give them “seed” money. One thing: I do not see the same thing in Matthew you see. The “goats” are not, in my understanding, actually believers–one cannot “lose” salvation, it is given by grace, so of course we cannot (initially or subsequently) merit it. If we love others as ourselves, we naturally give to them when we see need. If we don’t, well, retention of our substance is our reward (much as Jesus said of the Pharisees, “They have their reward). It is enough for me that (a) I see a need and (b) God will reward our giving from a pure heart. How he rewards, I leave to him.

  2. The reward may not be in this lifetime, although I suppose it could be, Don. As I mentioned in the body of my blog post, there are far too many righteous people out there who have lived and died in abject poverty for me to believe God must take care of even the most basic needs of all Christians everywhere.

    As far as losing salvation, I’m not sure how to explain the following:

    “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter. Many will say to Me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in Your name, and in Your name cast out demons, and in Your name perform many miracles?’ And then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness.’

    Matthew 7:21-23 (NASB)

    The people Jesus is addressing apparently believe they are saved and yet, Jesus casts them out.

  3. Lord knows that plenty of churches — particularly in the prosperity gospel ilk — have screwed up the idea of “treasure”. However, I think the idea of Matt 6:19-21 is pretty straightforward, whether one has a “Jewish lens” or not:

    19 “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. 20 “But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys, and where thieves do not break in or steal; 21 for where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.

    “Storing treasure in heaven” means that the things you regard as valuable are the eternal things, rather than the temporal things on earth. Having this eternal perspective will influence every aspect of life (your heart), including how you handle the temporal things over which you have been given stewardship.

  4. I don’t think there’s anything bad or wrong about your interpretation of the text, but the question is, was that Jesus’ intent in saying those words or Matthew’s intent in recording them? How did the original audiences understand this message?

    Since we exist outside the original context in which this part of the gospel was delivered, we lack a lot of the environmental “clues” necessary to understand how Jesus’ listeners heard what he was saying. Without those clues (or cues), it’s possible, even being able to read the original language of Matthew’s gospel, to misunderstand what he was saying. That’s one of the reasons New Testament studies continue.

    Of course, as I said above, there certainly is nothing wrong with de-emphasizing material treasures in our lives and focusing on heavenly treasures, but that might not be the entire message Jesus was trying to deliver.

  5. The evil eye is found in Deut. 15:9 in a context of giving to the poor: a poor brother (a Hebrew men or woman, as in 15:12) should be loaned whatever he needs; so don’t harden your heart against him, or have a hostile/evil eye towards your poor brother (15:7-9). The context of Mt. 6:23 (the “unsound eye”) is also surrounded by teaching against greed that seeks treasures on earth (including, I think, 6:25-33, which is about those anxiously seeking the best food, drink, and clothing).

    The evil eye returns in Mt. 20:15, where Jesus’ second question (in this verse), translated literally, is “Is your eye evil because I am good?” The evil eye of the worker complaining about his landlord’s generosity makes this worker the villain of the story.

    The “goats” in Mt. 25 also show similar eyes when they refuse to help “the least of these my brothers.” I think that–similar to Deut. 15 where brothers are other Hebrews in the kingdom of Israel–that Jesus’ brothers are his disciples (as he states in Mt. 12:49-50). So all the nations are being judged according to how they reacted to Jesus’ brothers/disciples when they go out on mission (reflecting Jesus’ teaching in Mt. 10 about going out on mission and depending on the reception of those to whom they go for room and board, with the final verse, 10:42–about whoever gives to one of these little (least) ones even a cup of cold water, because he is a disciple, will not lose his reward–reflecting giving drink to the thirsty in 25:35.) Thus the help given to these needy brothers (of Jesus) is part of receiving them and their mission message. And, as 10:40 already said, “He who receives you receives me.”

    The treasure in heaven of Mt. 6:20 is another phrase found later in Matthew, in 19:21, where Jesus tells the rich man that what he lacks (in gaining eternal life) is to go, sell his treasured possessions (his treasures on earth), and give to the poor, and he will have treasure in heaven; and come follow me (Jesus). So again, Jesus emphasizes generosity toward the poor, rather than greed for one’s own treasures (on earth), in a context of following him. A true disciple gives up greed and gives generously; this is part of being in Jesus’ new kingdom (of disciples); and this new kingdom will enjoy even greater treasures in heaven in the future.

  6. James, thank you for your reply. If you read the preceeding verses (7:15 & subsequent)) you’ll see that “false prophets” were referenced and they were “never known”– meaning they did not in their heart (where it matters) believe. The “practice of lawlessness” is interesting. Here is a story that best explains this: There was some time ago a flamboyant criminal named Cohen. He was apparently “saved” by a series of ministers, but everyone noticed absolutely no change in his life. When asked, he replied, “There are Christian football players, Christian cowboys, why not a Christian gangster”?

    We can rest securely that we are saved by the grace of our lord. Our spirit is then keen to do the things that are pleasing to him–to become like him. So the works you wrote of today are the “fruits” of the Spirit–the law “written in our hearts.”

  7. Interesting and seems supportable, Don. On the other hand, I have a feeling that there are people, maybe even a lot of people who are in churches today, who believe they are saved but who, like the infamous Cohen you mentioned, are not living transformed lives. Every tree is known by its fruit, not what it calls itself.

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